High Cortisol Levels and the risk of Heart and Vascular Disease

High Cortisol Levels and the risk of Heart and Vascular Disease

Improve Athletic Performance by Measuring Your Cortisol

Here’s a surprising fact: Sometimes, training more can actually make you weaker. It sounds counterintuitive, but overtraining can set you back and increases the risk of injuries. Sometimes, it’s better to take a break and allow your body to recover. Sometimes, less really is more.

Take Your Training to the Next Level With These Tools

It's time to dig into the best tools for improving your training. Let's look behind the science of two well-established markers of training readiness and recovery: HRV and cortisol.

Cortisol and Weight Loss

It’s like that Greek myth about the man cursed to roll a boulder up a steep hill for eternity. Every time he neared the top, the boulder would roll back down. And he’d have to start all over again.

Cortisol and Burnout

We all know how it feels to be stressed. Stress, after all, is part of our everyday lives. It’s that feeling we get whenever we face a new demand and our body goes into high alert. It’s why we often think of stressed people as tense or on edge.

What Is Cortisol

When you think about stress, what comes to mind? Looming work deadlines, financial worries, feeling overwhelmed? In today’s world, stress can take on countless forms. Sometimes, it’s even a force of good. But a key reason behind it all is often overlooked. In this article we’ll explain everything: the good, the bad, the ugly, and why controlling your stress can be a matter of life or death.

Join the waitlist

Pardigm.com has developed a rapid test to measure cortisol at home, without the need for a lab. Be the first to know!

Jessica Cohn-Kleinberg

Written by

Jessica Cohn-Kleinberg

Written on:

November 30, 2021, 9:41:58 AM

Updated:

December 3, 2021, 10:15:16 AM